Low Supply/Delayed Breastmilk Production - Should you pump?

Should you keep pumping even if nothing is coming out? YES - Poor management of delayed milk production can lead to low supply and/or lactation failure.


What to do:
  1. See lactation ASAP

  2. Pump after breastfeeding or whenever the baby gets a bottle. The duration will depend on how much milk you are getting and whether or not you are putting baby to breast

  3. When possible, always put the baby to the breast before pumping. The skin-to-skin contact and the suckling sensation all get the breastfeeding hormones prolactin and oxytocin flowing, making your pump session more effective.

  4. DO NOT over-supplement. Giving baby more formula/donor milk supplementation than they need will only make them lazy at the breast, encourage breast refusal, and increase maternal stress as their intake outpaces your output.

  5. Use a powerful pump. Wearable pumps are not going to fix low supply OR delayed milk production. Set yourself up for success, create a pump station, try and relax, hydrate, and ensure you are getting adequate calories and some rest.

  6. Address any suck issues. If your LO cannot provide adequate stimulation due to a poor suck (tongue-tie, lip-tie, low muscle tone, uncoordinated suck reflex, etc.), then you need to pump with all feedings. It took Gray-Gray about 5 weeks to regain normal suck on the right breast after his tongue-tie. I pumped the entire time. How many of you feel your low supply was due to improper management during the early postpartum phase? Let's chat in the comments below⤵️

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